Last week, the Assembly and Senate Appropriations Committees took up their respective suspense files ahead of the Friday, May 17, fiscal deadline. Some of the more egregious gun bills failed to meet the deadline including the firearm excise tax, vehicle storage and dealer liability insurance bills, while other anti-gun bills continue on. Below find the respective actions of firearm and hunting related measures. The legislation that was passed by the committees will next head to the floor for a vote.


Assembly Bill 284, sponsored by Assembly Member Jim Frazier (D-11), would permanently place in statute California’s junior hunting license, which is due to sunset in 2020. AB 284 was held under submission.

Assembly Bill 18, sponsored by Assembly Member Marc Levine (D-10), would impose a $25 excise tax on a handgun, semiautomatic rifle or shotgun purchased as new from a retailer. AB 18 also creates the California Violence Intervention and Prevention (CalVIP) Firearm Tax Fund, which the new excise tax will fund and the funds will be administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award competitive grants for the purpose of violence intervention and prevention. AB 18 was held under submission.

Assembly Bill 688, sponsored by Assembly Member Kansen Chu (D-25), would place stringent storage requirements on all firearms that are left in an unattended vehicle, regardless of the duration. The requirements set forth in this legislation are overly burdensome and in some cases unattainable storage options that are neither practical nor possible for the average firearm owner who may temporarily leave their vehicle unattended on their way into the field or to the range. AB 688 was held under submission.

Assembly Bill 1064, sponsored by Assembly Member Al Muratsuchi (D-66), would place further restrictions on licensed firearms dealers including expressly allowing localities to impose requirements beyond state law and imposes an onerous insurance requirement including vicarious liability coverage. AB 1064 was held under submission.

Assembly Bill 879, sponsored by Assembly Member Mike Gipson (D-64), would require precursor firearms parts to be sold/transferred through a licensed precursor parts dealer in a similar process to the new laws regarding ammunition purchases. It would further create a registry of these parts and a new crime for transfer of precursor parts without the involvement of a licensed precursor parts dealer to anyone under 21 years of age or prohibited from owning firearms. Precursor parts include items such as unfinished frames and receivers. AB 879 was passed by the Appropriations Committee and will now move to the Assembly floor where it will be eligible for a vote. Please use the TAKE ACTION button below to contact your State Assembly Member and urge him/her to OPPOSE AB 879.

Assembly Bill 1254, sponsored by Sydney Kamlager-Dove (D-54) would prohibit the ability to hunt, trap or otherwise take a bobcat except in specified circumstances including depredation permits. AB 1254 was passed by the Appropriations Committee and will now move to the Assembly floor and will be eligible for a vote.

Please use the TAKE ACTION button below to contact your State Assembly Member and urge him/her to OPPOSE AB 1254.

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